Cat Fostering Charleston SC

For many cat rescue groups, finding cat foster homes is an important part of the work they do. Sometimes these groups, which rescue cats and kittens from high-kill shelters, don't actually own a facility or shelter of their own. The foster home becomes an important stepping stone from the time the cat or kittens are rescued until they can be permanently placed for adoption. For more on cat fostering or adoption, please scroll below.

Fetch Doggy Day Care
(843) 225-3647
1990 Ashley River Road
Charleston, SC
 
Dixie Kennels
(843) 763-1100
5105-B Dixie Plantation Road
Charleston, SC
 
Low Country Pet Salon
(843) 573-0047
1757 Savannah Highway
Charleston, SC
 
Fresh & Fancy Kennels Of Charleston
(843) 571-4433
820 Dupont Road
Charleston, SC
 
Puppies & Kitties Pet Salon & Spa
(843) 763-0738
1954 Ashley River Road
Charleston, SC
 
Meeting Street Tack & Supply Co
(843) 766-4346
720 Dupont Road
Charleston, SC
 
Daisy's Place Retriever Rescue
(843) 240-0174
PO Box 20729
Charleston, SC
Membership Organizations
PetFinder.com

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Goose Creek Bed & Biscuit
(843) 574-9070
102 Central Avenue
Charleston, SC
 
Phoenix Rising Border Collie Rescue
www.prbcr.org
Charleston, SC
Membership Organizations
PetFinder.com

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At Home Pet Care
(843) 797-8600
210 Archibald Drive
Charleston, SC
 
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Is Fostering a Cat Right for Me?

Is Fostering a Cat Right for Me?

Becoming a foster provider to homeless cats or kittens can be a rewarding and fulfilling experience, and may be an ideal situation for families that are unwilling or unable to make a long-term commitment to a pet cat.

For many cat rescue groups, finding cat foster homes is an important part of the work they do. Sometimes these groups, which rescue cats and kittens from high-kill shelters, don't actually own a facility or shelter of their own. The foster home becomes an important stepping stone from the time the cat or kittens are rescued until they can be permanently placed for adoption.

Before you decide to become a foster provider, it's a good idea to take stock of your situation and decide if fostering a cat is really right for you. If you have young children or dogs, or if you work long hours, you may not be able to provide a suitable home for some cats, and fostering a kitten may be nearly impossible. It helps if the whole family is committed to the process of fostering a cat, because each cat might be with you for several months. If you have a cat of your own, you should make sure its vaccinations are up to date, to guard against exposing it to infectious diseases. It may also be wise to quarantine incoming foster pets until their health can be adequately assessed and they can be tested for infectious diseases like feline leukemia.

Keep in mind that the cats coming to you may have been abandoned by previous owners or may have spent several weeks caged at a shelter. These cats may be frightened, stressed, or poorly nourished and will need love and attention to help them become socialized. Some may need to be re-trained in using a litter pan or may need to be coaxed to eat. You may also be called upon to administer medicine to a cat with a health problem, or care for an older, special needs cat with diminished eyesight or hearing.

Before you decide to become a foster provider, find out which costs you will be asked to cover. Some rescue groups work only with people who can afford to "donate" the food and kitty litter used by the foster cat, while others will give you monthly stipend to cover these costs. Most groups will reimburse you for the cost of any veterinary care that is needed.

In some cases you may be asked to provide a foster home to a mother cat with a litter of very young kittens. This is not as much effort as it may seem to be, because for the first month of the kittens' life, the mom will do most of the work, nursing and grooming her offspring. Kittens can generally be weaned at four to six weeks, and separated from their mother by the age of four weeks.

One of the greatest challenges is taking in unweaned or orphaned kittens. Not only are newborn kittens fragile and vulnerable, but they'll be depending on you to take the place of their missing mother. For the first two weeks of life, before kittens even open their eyes, they are completely helpless. You'll have to keep the kittens very warm, and feed them ...

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Tips for Being a Good Kitty Foster Parent

Tips for Being a Good Kitty Foster Parent

Many people find that becoming a foster provider to homeless cats or kittens is a rewarding and fulfilling experience. Foster care for cats basically requires patience, a compassionate nature, a flexible lifestyle, and some experience with and knowledge of cat behavior. Below are some general tips that may ease your transition into foster care.

Tips For Fostering Adult Cats:

  • Don't give a foster cat the run of your house right away. Start out by confining him to a bathroom, spare bedroom, or finished basement at first. If you have cats of your own, keep them separated until the health of your foster cat can be verified.
  • Provide a cozy bed, a bowl of fresh water, and a clean litter pan at all times.
  • In the beginning, approach your foster cat slowly, cautiously, and in a non-threatening way. Give it a chance to become accustomed to its new surroundings.
  • Don't allow a cat to go without eating for more than a day or two: fasting can have serious health consequences in cats. If your foster cat has to be coaxed to eat, try tempting treats like canned salmon or tuna, or strained baby food meats.

Tips For Fostering Nursing Mother Cats With A Litter Of Kittens:

  • Provide a box big enough for everyone, with sides tall enough to keep the kittens from falling out, but low enough that the mother can come and go easily.
  • Line the box with several layers of bedding so that you can peel away layers as the kittens soil the top layer.
  • As long as the mom is actively engaged with her kittens, let her do the work of feeding and caring for them. Take your cues from her - a foster cat may prefer that you stay away from her kittens for the most part.
  • Provide a nutrient-dense diet for the mother cat. Kitten food is ideal. Offer food several times a day, or consider keeping a bowl of dry food available to her at all times. And don't forget to keep a bowl of fresh water near by at all times.
  • It's normal for the mother cat to want time away from her kittens between feedings. Once the kittens start exploring, you can keep them contained in one room with a baby gate that the mother can easily jump over.
  • Kittens will begin trying out moist kitten food at about four weeks of age. If any seem slow to begin feeding on their own, you can help out by putting a bit on your finger to let them smell it. Other weaning tricks involve putting a bit of food on the kittens' face or paw so that they lick it off, or trying strained baby food meats in lieu of kitten food.

Tips For Fostering Orphaned kittens:

  • Kittens will soil their nest box every day, so use disposable cardboard boxes and washable or disposable bedding. (Make sure the sides of the box are tall enough that very tiny kittens cannot tumble out.)
  • Use a heating pad on one side of the nest box only, so that kittens can move away if they get too warm. Keep the pad at a low setting, and wrap it well in blankets or towels.
  • Buy commercial kitten formula and a feeding bottle or syringe that holds...
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